Stuck in a Literary Sexual Rut

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Oh the problems one encounters when writing sensual romance novels.  As explained in my earlier blog post, Sweet, Sensual or Erotic Romance? Why I Write Sensual, there is a distinct difference between sensual romance and erotica. In sensual romance the sex scenes are written to help enhance the plot as the characters consummate their relationship. The emphasis is on what the people are feeling, while in erotica the emphasis is the sex act itself. The characters’ feelings and emotions are of lesser importance. Most of the storyline in erotic literature focuses around having sex, where a sensual romance may only include a few sex scenes.

That said, as I’m working on my third novel, The Journey, I found myself in a bit of a rut when writing my sex scenes. Let’s face it. There are only two kinds of equipment out there, and that equipment only works certain ways. I was starting to worry that my sex scenes might be becoming redundant.

I decided to do a little research, so the other day I downloaded a copy of an anthology by Anais Nin called, Little Birds. Ms. Nin is perhaps the “literary madam,” of erotic literature. I thought I might learn something new about writing erotic scenes from her. What I found, at least in my opinion, were stories that were a little cold. The characters were one-dimensional and lacked passion. Afterwards I looked at my own writing, and I think there’s something to be said for writing about what the characters are feeling, emotionally as well as physically. As for the redundancy–I suppose it is what it is. Even Ms. Nin’s stories were a bit redundant, yet decades later readers still enjoy them. I guess there are some things in life that people probably aren’t going to get tired of. Like having sex. And eating chocolate cake..

MM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No, I Don’t Do Formula Writing

No SymbolI got the nicest compliment from a woman who told me how much she enjoyed reading The Deception. She compared me to Nora Roberts, which I thought was very kind. Then she told me that unlike Nora Roberts, I don’t use formula writing. I’ll admit I haven’t read that many Nora Roberts books, but she told me that every Nora Roberts novel follows the same pattern, and that her books are very predictable. What she liked about The Deception was that it wasn’t predictable at all. The plot twists kept her attention and kept her turning the pages.

Well, what can I say? I strive to create realistic, three-dimensional characters, and I try to write life-like story lines, (albeit somewhat exaggerated.) As I write I tune into my character’s minds. I try to see what they’re seeing and to feel what they’re feeling. I’m concerned about the conflicts they’re facing, and how they’re going to resolve them. I simply can’t worry about having to have the leading lady met the leading man by page ten, or about having my climax occur twenty pages before the novel ends. That kind of rigidness would destroy my creativity as stifle me a storyteller.

Real life isn’t a formula, at least mine isn’t. In my world Murphy’s Law is alive and well, and I came from a family that knows how to put the fun in dysfunctional. That kind of a background can be a real inspiration for writing a good story, therefore my character’s lives don’t follow a pattern either. Murphy’s Law is alive and well in their world, just like in mine. Life isn’t predictable. Neither are my novels.

MM