I’m So Sorry To Be the Cause of Your Sleepless Nights

Reunion Loew CoverWebJust read a new review of The Reunion posted by a reader on Amazon. She mentioned being up until three o’clock in the morning reading the book because she simply couldn’t put it down. Funny thing is, she’s not the first one with this “problem.” I’ve had similar “complaints” posted by friends on Facebook.

Well, what can I say? I’m sorry to be the cause of your sleepless nights, (she writes tongue in cheek). And you should see it from my end. There was many a night while I was writing The Reunion, (and The Deception and The Journey), that I didn’t get to bed until well after midnight either because the ideas kept flowing. There were other times when I crawled into bed, so exhausted my that body ached, and then, just as I started to relax–BING! Out of nowhere came the next inspiration. I’ve learned, from experience, that if I go to sleep with the idea of writing it down the next morning the idea would be forgotten by the time I awoke. So I grumbled to myself as I got out of bed and went back on the computer, knowing full well that I might have to forgo a good night’s sleep. Fortunately, it wouldn’t take very long for me to get the idea down. Then I could finally go to sleep, and do the revising later.

So, what is it about my books that’s so compelling? From what you, the readers, tell me, it’s the plot twits and the characters. You’ve been telling me that my characters are very real and very believable. I honestly wish I could tell you my secret of how I create them, but I don’t know how I do it either. Some characters, like Ian and Samantha in The Reunion, are inspired by real people. I’ll use some of their real personalities as a starting point, then next thing I know the characters have taken on lives of their own and they have become unique individuals.¬† The same could be said for all the purely fictitious characters who weren’t inspired by anyone in particular. I guess something must be going on in my subconscious mind. Whatever it is, it seems to be working, and I’m pleased you all are happy with the results. Meantime, while I wait for The Journey to come back from the editor, I’m cooking up a new cast of characters for my next book, The Betrayal. Look for that one sometime in 2014.

So for now, sleep tight.

MM

Meet Jeremy Palmer, Leading Man in THE JOURNEY

Photo by Fotolia.com

It’s funny how things sometimes work out. Jeremy Palmer was originally intended to be a rouge character in The Reunion. He would make a brief appearance, do his dirty deed, and then disappear into the night. But sometimes things don’t go exactly as planned. As I was writing The Reunion, I came to realize that Ian, the leading man, wouldn’t have had such an evil son. So Jeremy went from rogue villain to a rival, competing with his father for Gillian’s affections, and creating a storyline that many readers tell me was their favorite part of The Reunion. Jeremy blossomed. Okay, he jumped off the page. He became a sexy, vibrant character worthy of having his own novel,¬†The Journey.

We first meet Jeremy in The Reunion as a twenty-one-year-old bartender. He has his father’s good looks, and his mother’s bold, sometimes too direct, personality. Jeremy isn’t one to mince words. He likes to get straight to the point, and his bluntness occasionally gets him into trouble.

The Journey begins approximately eighteen months after The Reunion has ended. Jeremy is now working as an engineer, and he’s happily married to Cassie. (You really didn’t think Ian would have allowed him to steal Gillian away, did you?) Jeremy’s world turns upside down the night Cassie is seriously injured in a car crash. He rushes to the hospital and stays by her side. While Cassie recovers they befriend¬†Denise, one of Cassie’s nurses. Denise seems familiar, and while Jeremy can’t quite place her, she has never forgotten how he jilted her, years before. Denise wants a second chance with Jeremy, and she’s about to unleash an evil plan to win him back.
Jeremy is a purely fictitious character. He wasn’t inspired by anyone I knew in real life, although his character is very similar to the young Ian seen in the flashback chapters of The Reunion. The younger Ian was inspired by someone I knew, long ago. And just like his father, Ian, Jeremy will make his fair share of mistakes, no doubt making some readers saying, “Like father, like son.”
MM

It’s Okay. They’re Just Storybook Characters

BooksThe other day I read an article about the upcoming fall TV season, which mentioned that an actress on a top-rated show has decided not to return. It was followed by the usual comments. Some were sorry to see her leave, others thought the show would be better off without her. One comment was a bit odd. Among other things, the woman “prayed” for the characters.

Say what?

The highest compliment you can give any actor, or fiction writer, is to tell them their characters seem real. And the keyword here is, seem. They’re fictitious characters. They’re not actual living, breathing human beings, although they may seem very real in the pages or on the screen. And while prayers for the actors, or the writers, would certainly be appreciated, praying for a fictional character is a bit creepy. It sort of reminds me of Stephen King’s Misery.

Some of my characters; Ian Palmer, Samantha Walsh, Alex Montoya, and Jason and Gillian Matthews, were inspired by real people I’ve known. Meaning I drew on the personalities of real individuals to create the characters, but they’re all fictitious and most certainly not clones of their real-life counterparts. I go to a great deal of trouble to make my characters as three-dimensional as I possibly can, and yes, bad things happen to good people in my books. That’s because plot lines revolve around tension and conflict, followed by a happy ending. I love it when readers and reviewers say they cheered for my good guys, and wanted to smack my bad guys.

I’m glad you love my characters, and I’m always thinking up new ones. You can certainly say a prayer for the real-life people who inspired some of them, but please, not for the characters themselves. They’re not real. Sometimes I wish some of them were, but that’s a post for another day.

MM