This Time I’m Doing It Backwards

Reverse Clock
Photo by CanStockPhoto.com

I may not be a formula writer, but there are certain rules for basic plot structure fiction writers have to follow. A protagonist is trying to achieve a certain goal, but an antagonist gets in their way. This creates the conflict that drives the story. The conflict builds to a climax, followed by a conclusion. This is, for all intents and purposes, the tonal scale for a novel writer. And in romance, the expected conclusion is for the couple to end up married, or engaged, or to make some other commitment to one another.

My first three novels, The Reunion, The Deception, and The Journey, all ended with the leading characters getting married, or, in the case of The Journey, remarried, but with my upcoming novel, The Betrayal, I’ve deviated of course. In fact, I’ve kind of done it in reverse.

The Betrayal is the story of a married woman who discovers, in a rather bizarre way, that her husband is cheating on her. So, instead of a protagonist finding her true love and getting married, I’ve have a protagonist trying to get herself unmarried. Of course, she’ll still meet Mr. Right along the way, but this time the ending is different. Emily, the leading lady, is once again single, and while she and the leading man are most certainly in love with one another, neither are ready for a commitment, leaving the other characters, and the reader, speculating that they will probably marry–someday.

I took this path with this story because I think it’s more like real-life. Divorced people are often gunshy at the idea of remarriage. I also think readers like variety. I know I do as a writer, and having all my characters go up the aisle at the end of each novel gets redundant over time. It might make me a “formula” writer, and that’s something I don’t want to become.

Look for The Betrayal to be released later this summer.

MM