The Forgotten DECEPTION Chapter

Well, stuff happens.

As I mentioned in my last post, while I’m waiting for my latest novel, The Letter, to come back from the editor, I decided to do a minor edit on The Deception. The two stories are similar, and in the five years since I wrote The Deception, I’ve improved as a writer, so I wanted to go back and tweak some of the text to make the story flow a little smoother. However, as I was working I kept wondering where one of my scenes went. I recalled writing it, but I wasn’t seeing it in the file. Short story long, it had somehow been overlooked when the book was typeset, and I missed the error. Yikes!

Fortunately, it wasn’t a pivotal scene, which is why I hadn’t noticed it before. In the missing chapter, one of the villains is arrested and carted off to jail. The villain has committed a serious crime, and, in a prior chapter, another character has come forward with enough evidence to guarantee a conviction, so it had already been established that the villain would end up in jail. Then, near the end of the book, the villain is seen appearing in court. The missing chapter, however, is a nice, “you had it coming,” moment for readers, as you get to see the surprised villain put in handcuffs and hauled away.

The new, revised edition of The Deception, which includes the missing chapter, is now available for the Amazon Kindle, and the print edition will soon be available.

MM

 

Entering The Clean Up Phase

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I’ve been busy putting the final touches on the first draft for my upcoming novel, The Letter, and I’m now in what I call, “the cleanup phase.”

Something that has always bothered me with many novels is that we would reach the big climax scene, and then, once it was over, shazam! Everything magically falls back into place right then and there, and then, one or two pages later, everyone rides off into the sunset. The end.

Wouldn’t it be great if real life was as simple?

Since I’ve always strived to make my stories as realistic and believable as possible, I include a “cleanup phase,”after the big climax. This gives my characters a chance to deal with the aftermath of whatever happened during the climax. It can be as short as an epilogue, or as long as several chapters. If a character is injured, you’ll see his or her recovery. If a villain gets arrested, you’ll find out how long the prison sentence is. If someone leaves town, he or she will have the chance to say goodbye. The leading characters will work out whatever unresolved conflicts they may have. In other words, I tie up of all the loose ends. I don’t write sequels, so I want each ending to be as complete, and as satisfying as possible for the reader.

MM

Themes and Plotlines

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At long last, I’m finally in the home stretch for my upcoming novel, The Letter, and the theme for this novel would be things aren’t always as they appear to be.

Some of you may be wondering, what’s a theme? A theme is separate from the plotline. A theme is that underlying part of a story, such as the moral, or perhaps a comment about society or human behavior. I’ve posted the themes from my earlier novels below, but don’t worry. If you’ve not read all of them I won’t spoil the story.

ForgivenessThe Reunion. Ian was the one true love of Gillian’s life, but he suddenly ended their relationship for no apparent reason. If Gillian can forgive him, she stands a good chance of having a future with him. This theme carries over into a subplot concerning Ian and a member of his immediate family.

AdulteryThe Deception and The Betrayal. Adultery is a great theme for the romance genre. It’s an opportunity to explore the repercussions for everyone involved, as it often affects more than the two primary parties. In The Deception, Carrie, a single woman, meets Scott, a married man who has presented himself to her as a single man. In The Betrayal, faithful wife Emily unwittingly catches her husband, Jesse, in the act with another woman. Both women’s lives are turned upside down by circumstances beyond their control.

RevengeThe Journey and The Stalker. Life isn’t always fair, and we all experience times when things don’t go our way. However, it doesn’t necessarily mean someone has intentionally thwarted us. Sometimes stuff simply happens. Unfortunately, there really are people out there who subscribe to the notion of don’t get mad, get even. In The Journey, Denise seeks revenge on Jeremy for having turned down her romantic overture years before, while Craig, in The Stalker, relentlessly hounds Rachel for getting a promotion he felt she didn’t deserve.

And those are my themes, so far. We’ll have to wait and what my next theme will be. Until then, happy reading.

MM

 

 

Writing Dialog and Experiencing My Characters’ Emotions

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One of my cousins, who used to be an actress, once told me how she would feel her characters’ emotions as she portrayed them. She said that performing emotionally charged scenes left her feeling drained.

The same is true for me as a novel writer. With nearly every character I create, I experience their emotions as I write my scenes. Writing the dialog is usually the catalyst that drives those emotions.

I’m working on my next novel, The Letter. Leading man Danny is being hounded by Martha, a woman from his past, and I’ve been building up to a major confrontation between the two of them for sometime. This past week, I finally wrote the chapter where their conflict reaches its crescendo. I expected this scene to be fun to write. Martha really has been a pain in the butt who most certainly has it coming, and I wanted Danny to feel vindicated. However, as I wrote the dialog I started feeling emotions I didn’t expect to feel.

Danny wants no further contact from Martha, but an obsessed Martha refuses to let him go. As the scene plays out, Danny becomes more and more frustrated with her unending state of denial, and as he struggles to get through to her he becomes more verbally harsh. I started feeling anxious as I wrote the dialog. Harsh words, even when justified, can hurt like a fist, and some of the verbiage I used brought back memories of arguments I had with men from my own past. By the time I finished I felt as if I’d been sucker punched by both Danny and Martha.

It was at this point that I’d planned to write Martha out of the story completely and have another antagonist take over, but now I think I’ll keep her around. She has a real knack for pissing people off, and talent like hers shouldn’t go to waste. While the new antagonist will be the main focus for the remainder of the story, Martha will spend some time going after those who she thinks turned Danny against her.

The Letter should be available by the spring of 2018.

MM

 

I Wish There was a Genre Called “Relationship Fiction”

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This may sound arrogant or even hokey, but I get weary of hearing myself say, “I write romance novels,” whenever I’m asked about what I do. People either think I’m writing schmaltzy dime store novels, or they think I’m writing erotica. Neither is the case, as there is so much more to what I write.

I write stories about human relationships. Love isn’t limited to a man and a woman falling in love and living happily ever after. Love is about all kinds of human relationships; the love of a parent to a child, the love between siblings, even the platonic love between close friends. The romantic love between a man and woman is only a part of my story. The Journey includes a heartwarming subplot about the relationship between brothers Jeremy and Larry Palmer, as Larry puts his life on hold for a time to help his ailing brother through a life altering crisis. That’s true love. In The Deception, a father literally takes a bullet meant for his child. That’s also true love. In The Betrayal, leading lady Emily’s long estranged aunt finally reaches out and accepts her like another daughter. That too is love.

The reason why I write romance, instead of science fiction or mystery or horror, is because I’ve always been fascinated by the complexity and dynamics of human relationships; not only between lovers, but between family members as well. Of course those relationships can be part of the storyline in those other genres, but the romance genre is the only one where the primary focus is on human relationships. I’m just trying to expand the boundaries.

MM

 

THE STALKER is Back from the Editor

Hands at KeyboardMy latest novel has just returned from the editor, and she tells me she loved it. She says it’s one of my best stories to date, and she should know. She’s been my editor since my very first novel, The Reunion.

The Stalker was inspired by a real-life Facebook feud unfolding on my newsfeed. Of course, a Facebook feud would make for a dull narrative in a novel as the characters would be typing back and forth on a computer or tablet. Boring! To make the story work I would have to have my characters out in the real world, so the villain does a whole lot more than harass her on Facebook. He does drivebys past her house. He pops up when she’s out in public. His goal is to completely destroy her career and ruin her life, and he won’t allow anyone or anything to get in his way. In other words, he’s one of my most devious villains to date, and he makes The Stalker a real page turner.

The Stalker is now with the proofreader, and I’m hoping to release it in November. Stay turned.

MM

 

Life Inside the Writing Tunnel

Fantastic Trees - Tunnel of Love with fairy light afar, magic background
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I’ve spent the past few months back inside the writing tunnel. The writing tunnel is that magical place where my stories are created. Okay, it’s actually a den I converted into an office, or even the occasional hotel room, but nevertheless, the writing tunnel is where I go to let my imagination take over and create my stories.

Readers tell me it’s hard to put my books down. And you all should see it from my end. I get up each morning and try to put in a little writing time before getting bogged down with all the “real job” stuff. Then, in the evenings, instead of watching television, I’m back into my manuscript, working out the next scene, or the next chapter, or creating a new character. It’s so much fun. I just wish I could figure out why I’m still paying for cable. Must be for those times when I’m not writing.

Sometimes people ask me how I do my job. Do I work out a detailed outline first and then follow it verbatim? Or do I just sit down and start writing? It’s a little bit of both actually. First I’ll write a treatment, or short plot summary. It’s not too specific and it’s only a few paragraphs in length. It’s my idea for the basic story concept, but not much else. I use it mainly to get the story started, and so I’ll have a rough idea of how it will end. Once I start writing the actual story I set the treatment aside and go where the characters take me. Then, when I’m finished with my story, I’ll go back and look at the original treatment. Without exception, it’s remarkably different from the finished novel, and sometimes the ending will be different as well. Someone once said life is what happens when you’re busy making other plans. I think the same could be said for good story writing.

MM

Swearing About My Dialoge

FwordOne of the more interesting challenges I face as an author is writing believable dialog, especially when the conflict has intensified and the characters are feeling the pressure. Those are the times when an, “oh my goodness gracious me,” just won’t cut it. But then again, I don’t want to take it too far the other way and risk offending you, my readers, as I’m aware that some of you have certain limits as to what language is and isn’t appropriate.

When necessary, my characters will say an occasional, “damn,” or “hell,” and oftentimes that’s enough to make the point. Sometimes a character, usually a villain, may call a woman a, “bitch,” or even a, “whore,” but since he or she is the bad guy, the character is meant to be offensive. I want you to hate my villains. They’re not meant to be nice people.

There may also be occasions when a character may exclaim, “son of a bitch.” This might happen if they’re suddenly shocked or surprised by something. It can also happen when they’re referring to a male villain who’s done something outrageous. Again, my villains aren’t meant to be nice. They’re supposed to make other characters angry, and dialog is the most effective way for them to express their anger. It’s also the kind of language we hear in real life when someone is angry.

There are, however, places where I draw the line. First and foremost is using the Lord’s name as a curse word. While I may not overtly religious, I still believe in God, so to me, it’s disrespectful. That’s why you’ll never hear any of my characters, not even the villains, saying the, “G-damn,” word, or using the names, “Jesus,” or “Christ,” as curse words.

The other word I won’t use is the “f-bomb,” as some readers simply find it too offensive. This can be tricky, as there are some situations when even a, “what the hell,” may not be enough. That’s when I’ll have another character interrupt just in time. That way the word is implied, but not actually said.

I realize there are some folks out there who may even find the word, “damn,” offensive, but as an author, I know I can’t be all things to all readers. I’ll also be the first to admit that my novels aren’t for everyone. So if you’re looking for a good, sensual romance, with believable characters who speak the way that real people talk, but without being potty mouths, you’ve come to the right place.

MM

The Question I’m Most Often Asked

bookseries
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The question I’m most often asked is…Are your books a series?

 

And the answer is…No.

Apparently a lot of authors like to write series books, and readers must like them, but the authors who I consider to be my mentors, such as Danielle Steele and Rosamunde Pilcher, do not series books. Their novels are all stand alone books, as are mine. One trick I have borrowed from Ms. Pilcher, however, is to take a minor character from one book and incorporate him or her into another novel, as she did when she took a minor character from The Shell Seekers, and used him to introduce a new cast of characters in September

 

The Reunion was my first novel, and when I wrote my second novel, The Deception, I decided to have a chapter take place at Hanson Sisters Fine Art, the gallery owned by Gillian, the leading lady in The Reunion. In an early draft of The Deception, Gillian’s sister and business partner, Cynthia Lindsey, made a cameo appearance. However, the scene was later cut and replaced Cynthia being discussed in a conversation between two Deception characters. Either way, it was a nice way to incorporate the two novels together.

 

The Journey comes the closest to being a sequel as it uses the same cast of characters as The Reunion, although it too is a stand alone book. Ian and Gillian, the leading characters from The Reunion appear in The Journey. However, their story has already been told, so this time around they are supporting characters only. The lead characters in The Journey are Ian’s son, Jeremy, and his wife, Cassie. There are also references made in The Journey to events that took place in The Reunion, but they’re only vaguely discussed, and I worded them in such a way that those readers who hadn’t read The Reunion would see it as a part of the backstory. In other words, you don’t have to have read The Reunion in order to read and enjoy The Journey. Also look for George McCormick, a featured character in The Deception, to make an appearance in The Journey.

 

Kyle Madden, the leading man in The Betrayal, was a minor character in The Reunion. In The Reunion, Kyle was the police detective who warned Gillian about her ex husband, Jason. This time around the roles are reversed, and it’s Gillian who has a minor role when, once again, a scene takes place at Hanson Sisters Fine Art.

 

I’m currently working on my fifth novel, The Stalker, and Jonathan Fields, a featured character from The Deception, has already made an appearance. So far no one’s been to Hanson Sisters Fine Art, but then again, I’ve only just started writing.

 

MM

 

This Time I’m Doing It Backwards

Reverse Clock
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I may not be a formula writer, but there are certain rules for basic plot structure fiction writers have to follow. A protagonist is trying to achieve a certain goal, but an antagonist gets in their way. This creates the conflict that drives the story. The conflict builds to a climax, followed by a conclusion. This is, for all intents and purposes, the tonal scale for a novel writer. And in romance, the expected conclusion is for the couple to end up married, or engaged, or to make some other commitment to one another.

My first three novels, The Reunion, The Deception, and The Journey, all ended with the leading characters getting married, or, in the case of The Journey, remarried, but with my upcoming novel, The Betrayal, I’ve deviated of course. In fact, I’ve kind of done it in reverse.

The Betrayal is the story of a married woman who discovers, in a rather bizarre way, that her husband is cheating on her. So, instead of a protagonist finding her true love and getting married, I’ve have a protagonist trying to get herself unmarried. Of course, she’ll still meet Mr. Right along the way, but this time the ending is different. Emily, the leading lady, is once again single, and while she and the leading man are most certainly in love with one another, neither are ready for a commitment, leaving the other characters, and the reader, speculating that they will probably marry–someday.

I took this path with this story because I think it’s more like real-life. Divorced people are often gunshy at the idea of remarriage. I also think readers like variety. I know I do as a writer, and having all my characters go up the aisle at the end of each novel gets redundant over time. It might make me a “formula” writer, and that’s something I don’t want to become.

Look for The Betrayal to be released later this summer.

MM